Rowland Hill - V. Charlesworth - ebook

Rowland Hill - V. Charlesworth - ebook

$10.00
A great biography of an 18th century English revivalist, of which Charles Spurgeon wrote: 'Our friend Mr. Charlesworth, of the Stockwell Orphanage, has written a life of Rowland Hill, which in our judgment surpasses its predecessors in giving a full length portrait of the good man, and as this is readily to be had, we refer our readers to it.'

Following the example of George Whitefield, Rowland Hill decided to take the Gospel to the people. Even as a schoolboy , he preached out of doors and visited the sick. Appointed to an Anglican parish in Kingston, Somerset, he was denied admission to the Church of England ministry because the religious authorities detested his methods.

However, despite opposition and a strong Methodist influence, Rowland always followed Church of England procedures and remained an Anglican. He had a powerful voice and he knew how to reach common people. He drew large crowds. His book Village Dialogues suggests the kind of illustrations and sayings that made him a delight to listen to.

For example, "I would give nothing for that man's religion whose very dog and cat are not the better for it." It was Rowland who asked, "Why should the devil have all the good tunes?"--a saying often attributed to Martin Luther and John Wesley.

The poet and scholar Robert Southey said that he was as good a performer, in his own realm, as certain famous actors were in theirs.
Book Title Rowland Hill - V. Charlesworth - ebook
Author Revival Library Books
Type eBook
Date Published Jan 02, 2019
A great biography of an 18th century English revivalist, of which Charles Spurgeon wrote: 'Our friend Mr. Charlesworth, of the Stockwell Orphanage, has written a life of Rowland Hill, which in our judgment surpasses its predecessors in giving a full length portrait of the good man, and as this is readily to be had, we refer our readers to it.'

Following the example of George Whitefield, Rowland Hill decided to take the Gospel to the people. Even as a schoolboy , he preached out of doors and visited the sick. Appointed to an Anglican parish in Kingston, Somerset, he was denied admission to the Church of England ministry because the religious authorities detested his methods.

However, despite opposition and a strong Methodist influence, Rowland always followed Church of England procedures and remained an Anglican. He had a powerful voice and he knew how to reach common people. He drew large crowds. His book Village Dialogues suggests the kind of illustrations and sayings that made him a delight to listen to.

For example, "I would give nothing for that man's religion whose very dog and cat are not the better for it." It was Rowland who asked, "Why should the devil have all the good tunes?"--a saying often attributed to Martin Luther and John Wesley.

The poet and scholar Robert Southey said that he was as good a performer, in his own realm, as certain famous actors were in theirs.

Our websites